• Child & Baby CPR


    Although you hope you'll never use cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for a child or infant, it's important to know the steps so that you can help in the event of a cardiac or breathing emergency. And although you may have taken a class in child CPR, it's a good idea to keep the steps handy so that the information stays fresh in your memory. With our printable step-by-step guide, you can access the child and baby CPR steps anytime, anywhere. Simply print them up and place them in your car, your desk, your kitchen or with your other first aid supplies, then read over them from time to time to help maintain your skills.

    Before Giving Child or Baby CPR

    1

    Check the scene for safety, form an initial impression, obtain consent from the parent or guardian, and use personal protective equipment (PPE)


    2

    If the child or baby appears unresponsive, check the child or baby for responsiveness (shout-tap-shout)

    • For a child, shout to get the child’s attention, using the child’s name if you know it. If the child does not respond, tap the child’s shoulder and shout again while checking for breathing, life-threatening bleeding or another obvious life-threatening condition
    • For a baby, shout to get the baby’s attention, using the baby’s name if you know it. If the baby does not respond, tap the bottom of the baby’s foot and shout again while checking for breathing, life-threatening bleeding or another obvious life-threatening condition
    • Check for no more than 10 seconds

    3

    If the child or baby does not respond and is not breathing or only gasping, CALL 9-1-1 and get equipment, or tell someone to do so

     

    Performing Child & Baby CPR

    1

    Place the child or baby on their back on a firm, flat surface

    • For a child, kneel beside the child
    • For a baby, stand or kneel to the side of the baby, with your hips at a slight angle

    2

    Give 30 compressions

    • For a child, place the heel of one hand in the center of the child’s chest, with your other hand on top and your fingers interlaced and off the child’s chest
      • Position your shoulders directly over your hands and lock your elbows
      • Keep your arms straight
      • Push down hard and fast about 2 inches at a rate of 100 to 120 per minute
      • Allow the chest to return to normal position after each compression
    • For a small child, use a one-handed CPR technique
      • Place the heel of one hand in the center of the child’s chest
      • Push down hard and fast about 2 inches at a rate of 100 to 120 per minute
    • For a baby, place both thumbs (side-by-side) on the center of the baby’s chest, just below the nipple line
      • Use the other fingers to encircle the baby’s chest toward the back, providing support
      • Using both thumbs at the same time, push hard down and fast about 1 ½ inches at a rate of 100 to 120 per minute
      • Allow the chest to return to its normal position after each compression
    • Alternatively, for a baby, use the two-finger technique
      • Use two fingers placed parallel to the chest in the center of the chest
    • For a baby, if you can’t reach the depth of 1 ½ inches, consider using the one-hand technique

    3

    Give 2 breaths

    • For a child, open the airway to a slightly past-neutral position using the head-tilt/chin-lift technique
    • For a baby, open the airway to a neutral position using the head-tilt/chin-lift technique
    • Blow into the child or baby’s mouth for about 1 second
      • Ensure each breath makes the chest rise
      • Allow the air to exit before giving the next breath
    • If the first breath does not cause the chest to rise, retilt the head and ensure a proper seal before giving the second breath. If the second breath does not make the chest rise, an object may be blocking the airway

    4

    Continue giving sets of 30 chest compressions and 2 breaths until:

    • You notice an obvious sign of life
    • An AED is ready to use
    • Another trained responder is available to take over compressions
    • EMS personnel arrive and begin their care
    • You are alone and too tired to continue
    • The scene becomes unsafe
    • You have performed approximately 2 minutes of CPR (5 sets of 30:2), you are alone and caring for baby, and you need to call 9-1-1